Winged Ant Step By Step

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Ants are everywhere, especially in the summer, when the winged ants are flying around. Fish love to eat them, so it’s logical to have some ants in your fly box. This is an easy to tie pattern and with a little bit floatant, it swims very well. I tied here a version with some foam as underbody, coated with uv resin. It’s for the faster flowing water. I tie another version with the two segments completly made with uv resin without any foam. The secound version sits deeper in the surface film, which looks more natural in slow water, where the fish got more time to take a closer look. The shape of the hook is not so important, as long as the hook gap is big enough.

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Materials:

  • Hook: Dry fly hook # 12-16
  • Body: Foam coated wit Bug Bond UV Resin and colored with a black Marker Pen
  • Hackle: Whiting black
  • Wings: Flash Dubbing

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Tie in the foam and fold it to the front and tie it down.

Do the same for the front segment and color it with a marker pen.

Take some Bug Bond Original and cover both segments with the resin and harden it with your BB torch.

Take some strands of flash dubbing and tie it in just before the first segment. It should be tied in V-shaped, so it looks like wings.

Tie in a black hackle and wind it in three turns to the front and catch it with your thread and do a whip finish.

The result. A nice little ant fly ready for the fish.

Quill Body CDC Emerger No. 2 – Step By Step

It’s the end of April and the trout and grayling season will start soon.

Here’s another very good emerger pattern, which imitates some different may fly species, depending on the colour and size. It’s tied on the new Daiichi 1167 Klinkhamer hook, designed by the famous dutch fly tyer Hans van Klinken.

The Daiichi 1167 got a stronger wire compared to the Tiemco 212Y for example, which makes sure, that the abdomen hangs deep in the surface. That’s really important and that’s the reason, why this pattern got no tail or a trailing shuck, to make sure, that the abdomen is hanging deep in the surface.

The quill body is covered with a thin coating UV Resin.

 

Materials:

  • Hook: Daiichi 1167 # 14
  • Abdomen: Polish Quills &Tack Free UV Resin
  • Thorax: Oliver Edwards Master Class Dubbing
  • Wing case: CDC
  • Wing: CDC
  • Legs: Partridge

 

Put the hook into the vise, do a layer of thread and tie in a stripped peacock quill. Wind the quill around the hook shank and catch it with the tying thread.

 

Put a little drop of Tack Free UV Resin on the stripped peacock quill and spread it on the abdomen. Cure it with your UV torch.

 

Tie in two CDC feathers for the wing case. Then tie in the tip of another white CDC feather as a crippled wing.

 

Dub the body and tie in some partridge fibres to imitate the legs. Fold each CDC feather to the hook eye and catch it with the tying thread. The CDC wing should be exactly in the middle of the feathers.

 

Cut the CDC feathers for the wing case and do some turns with your whip finisher to create a little head. Varnish the head, if you like. That’s it, ready for fishing. ;-)

tight lines

Holger Lachmann

Quill CDC Emerger

A simple, but quiet effective mayfly emerger.Tie it in different sizes and colours to match the hatch. The body of the emerger should hang deep in the surface. Never put some floatant on the body, only a bit on the thorax and the wings if necessary. With the amount of uv-resin on the quill, you can control, how deep the fly should hang in the surface.

This pattern often made my day, when other patterns were ignored.

Materials:

  • Hook: TMC 212Y # 13
  • Abdomen: Stripped Peacock Quill and UV-Resin (use tack free resin, if not, you have to coat the resin with nail polish)
  • Thorax: Alpaka Dubbing
  • Wings: CDC and for splitting some Yarn

 

Tie in a stripped peacock quill.

 

Wind the stripped quill around the hook shank and catch it with your thread.

 

Put a layer of uv-resin around the quill body to secure it.

 

Tie in a piece of yarn.

 

Tie in a bunch of CDC fibres.

 

Spin the dubbing around the thread.

 

Dub the thorax.

 

Fold the yarn to the front to split the CDC and catch it with your thread.

 

Whip finish the fly and cut the CDC in shape.

 

View from underneath.

tight lines

Holger Lachmann

Biot CDC Parachute

Turkey biots are very good for tying dry fly bodies. They swim really well.

I don’t discribe every tying step here, because they are the same (except the biot abdomen) as you have seen at the quill body CDC parachute tutorial.

Materials:

  • Hook: TMC 100 # 16
  • Tail: Micro Fibetts
  • Abdomen: Turkey Biot
  • Wing: CDC
  • Hackle: Whiting Genetic Dry Fly
  • Thorax: SLF Masterclass

 

tight lines

Holger Lachmann