DPP – Deep Perch Popper

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When it’s getting colder, I like to fish for perch with popper-sytyle flies. I don’t fish them the normal way on the surface as a topwater fly. I use a super fast sinking line and attach just a short piece of mono or fc with a length between 100-50 cm to the front loop as a leader/tippet. The popper will float above the sinking line. The height it floats depends on the length of the tippet and on the current. The current will push the popper down.

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You should cast the line out and give it time to sink to the bottom. When you strip the line in, the popper swims towards the bottom. If you do a pause, the popper will rise towards the surface again. How often you strip and pause depends on the water you fish and the situation.

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Below is a very simple scheme of retrieving the popper.zig-zag

A very good fly even in murky water, because it makes a lot of shock waves. It also works great, when you have an uneven bottom and the risk to loose a normal streamer is very high.

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How to combine the advantages of pike tubes and streamers

Today, pike flies tied on tubes are very popular. You can tie them as long as you want without the levering effect of long hook shanks, which often causes lost fish. If the fish is hooked, the tube and the hook separates.

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If the hook point is dull, you don’t have to throw the whole expensive pike fly into the trash. You just remove the hook. So, you can fish your pike tubes a very long time.

Then again, there are some disadvantages. It takes more time to change the fly, because the rigging is more complicated. The tube fly swims straight through the water, without strong jigging up and down or jerks from side to side. You can put a heavy conehead on the leader, but it’s still more a wave movement than a true jigging.

So, what if you could combine the advantages of normal pike flies and pike tubes without big effort? Would be cool, right?

Well, it’s super simpel! Just use the “Lachmann Pike Rig”! ;-)

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It’s just an flexible extension for the hook. You need a ordinary bite wire with around 10 kg breaking strength (around 20 lbs) and two sleeves,  special sleeve pliers and a little bit power in your hands. It takes you about 60 seconds to make one. Just meassure the length of the tube, so the front loop just comes out of the front of the tube.

One important thing: You need to tie on tubes with a big diameter, so the extension fits through it. Eumer pike tubes hard in XL work fine, for example.

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Attach your normal bite wire with a snap to the tube and you’ve got a connection like with a normal hook eye, but you can change hook sizes easily or replace dull hooks.

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If you weighted your tube flies, they will jig, if you tie them with a flat big head, the will jerk from side to side. All what you want from a good pike fly.

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Just give this “rig” a try and make your own experiences!

I wish everybody an awesome pike season! Tight lines!

..that’s what they are made for!

Do you remember this pike streamer I’ve posted some time ago?

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When I was tying at the “Niederrheinischer Fliegenfischer Tag” some weeks ago, Frank Steinmann from Scale-Magazine came along and bought some pike streamers I’ve showed on the table at the show.

Today, I saw what happend to my little buddy from the above picture.

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It was eaten by an greedy pike!

It’s always cool to see such shots of a fish with a fly in its mouth that I’ve tied and a fishermen with a big smile on his face! That’s how it should be!

Hope you’ll catch some more Frank!

Btw: Go and visit www.scale-magazine.com it’s a really cool magazine!