Spring fair at ADH-Fishing

I’m very happy to be invited again to tie at the spring fair of adh-fishing in Peine on 3. + 4. march 2012.

As always it’ll be a great weekend with great casters and fly tyers like Christopher Rownes, Allan Bloch, Leif Stävmo, Mikael Frödin, Andy Weiß and more.

The best thing there is the atmosphere. You don’t feel like entering a shop, which is getting bigger and bigger btw, you feel like coming to friends!

I really LOVE the casting pool behind the shop, where you can test cast every rod, no matter single hand or spey rod, from Sage, Guideline, Orvis, Vision, Loop, Scierra and Scott.

Yeah, it’ll definitely be a fun weekend!

BE THERE OR BE SQUARE ! ! ! :-)

 

 

Matuka Streamer

Here’s a step by step tutorial for a matuka streamer. This type of streamer is very old and you don’t see it to often in the fly boxes of the fishermen today, but the truth is, that the feathers move nicely, especially when you put some weight in the front of the fly, which causes a jigging effect.

Materials:

  • Hook: Gamakatsu F 314 # 4
  • Feathers: Keough Saltwater Grizzly Hackle, Keough Saltwater Hackle
  • Body: SLF Saltwater Dubbing white and ginger
  • Eyes: Deer Creek Gator Eyes
  • Flash: Krinkle Mirror Flash
  • UV-Resin: Deer Creek Diamond Hard Tack Free Resin
  • Weight: Lead Wire
  • Ribbing: Mono

 

Wind some lead wire around the shank and secure it with super glue.

 

Create a little dubbing ball at the end of the hook shank, tie in a saltwater hackle and wind it around. The dubbing ball pushes the fibres to the sides.

 

Tie in a piece of mono for ribbing. Split the tying thread and put the dubbing mix in the gap. Spin the bobbin to twist the dubbing. Wind the dubbing around the hook shank and brush it with your velcro .

 

Take two feathers and pull some fibres from one side as shown on the photo. Tie in the feather at the front and secure them by ribbing them with the mono. Catch the ribbing with your thread.

 

Tie in some strands of krinkle mirror on each side and do a whip finish with your thread. Take two gator eyes and put them on each side. You should use super glue to secure them. The fly is nearly finished. Just take some Diamond Hard Tack Free resin and let it run between the eyes, then cure it with your uv torch. Repeat this till the gap between the eyes is filled. This makes the fly very strong and durable.

tight lines

Holger Lachmann

Cellphone Shrimp

Last night I wanted to tie a CDC-Shrimp. I’d just done the first few wraps with the tying thread, when my cell was ringing. My buddy Aik was calling. So, what to do? Stop tying? No way! :-) I clamped the cell between my ear and my shoulder and continued tying with this “special” posture…. When I finished the telephone conversation, the fly was finished too, including the back with Clear Cure Goo.

To be honest, I was concentrated on the call and was wondering, that the fly looked no too bad either. I should always tie without thinking! :-D

 

 

The Soft Brown Grizzly

 

Another all around seatrout fly. This pattern is inspired by the famous fly “Omøborsten”. This fly is mainly tied out of soft Keough grizzly saltwater hackles, which pulsate strongly in the water. I made a little video at the end of the tutorial, where you can get a slightly impression, how the fly mowes in the water.

Materials:

  • Hook: Partridge CS 54 # 6
  • Weight: Lead Wire
  • Tail: Dubbing & Keough Grizzly Saltwater Hackle
  • Ribbing: Mono
  • Body: SLF Dubbing & SLF Prism Dubbing, Keough Grizzly Saltwater Hackle
  • Front: Keough Grizzly Saltwater Hackle
  • Hot Spot: Fluo Thread

 

Wind the lead wire around the front part of the hook and secure it with super glue. Then create a little dubbing ball at the end of the fly.

 

Tie in a really big and soft hackle.

 

Wind the hackle around the hook shank.

 

Tie in some pheasant tippets.

 

Tie in the mono for ribbing. Then split the thread, put the dubbing in the gap and spin the bobbin to twist the thread and the dubbing. Wind the Dubbing around the shank.

 

Tie in another hackle…

 

…wind it towards the end of the fly. Secure the hackle by ribbing the it with the mono. Then brush the body, so the dubbing strands are mixed with the hackle fibres.

 

Tie in another big hackle at the front. This big front hackle pushes the water and creates much turbulance.

 

Create a nice little hot spot with your fluo thread and varnish it. That’s it!

tight lines

Holger Lachmann

click to play the video