Small Zonker-Baitfish

 

I like….no, I love streamers, which are easy to tie, but they always have to play nicely in the water. Zonker stripes are one of my favorite materials since a long time. It’s durable, easy to tie in and most important, it moves in the water like hell.

This little fellow is only about 5 cm long (less than 2 inches). The front part with dubbing and the eyes is coated with uv-resin, in this case I used Clear Cure Goo (CCG) which works really well. First I used CCG Hydro, which is fluid like water, to fix everything, than CCG Tack Free for the final coating.

It’s an all around baitfish pattern, which can be used for any type of predators. I tie it on a saltwater hook and nip down the barb, when using in freshwater. So I use often the same fly first in spring for seatrout and later in the year for brown trout.

 

Materials:

  • Hook: Gamakatsu SC 15 # 4
  • Weight: Lead Wire
  • Ribbing: Mono
  • Body: SLF Prism Dub in tan
  • Back and Tail: Zonker Stripe
  • Eyes and Head: 3 D Eyes, SLF Prism Dub and Clear Cure Goo

 

Wind the lead wire around the shank and secure it with super glue.

 

Tie in a piece of mono for ribbing.

 

Split the thread, put the SLF Prism Dub in the gap and spin the bobbin to twist the dubbing and the thread.

 

Wind the twisted dubbing around untill you reach the middle of the shank.

 

Tie an piece of zonker stripe.

 

Rib the Zonker with the mono and catch the mono with your thread.

 

Here you can see the nice profile of the zonker.

 

Dub the head in the same way like the body and brush it with your velcro brush.

 

Put some eyes on the head and and secure it with Clear Cure Goo Hydro. Then put a final coating of Clear Cure Goo Tack Free on the head.

 

No bubbles like with epoxy, just clear resin so you can see the hot twinkle of the Prism Dub.

tight lines

Holger Lachmann

Poor Mans Pattegrisen

The famous shrimp fly “Pattegrisen” is one of the most popular seatrout patterns of the last years for the fly fishermen at the Baltic sea. It’s a very large fly with a great movement in the water. The key-material are Rooster Spey Hackles from Whiting dyed in the colour salmon. The long soft  fibres pulsate, when retrieving with some stops . Lovely!

But there’s a little problem…. the original Whiting Rooster Spey Hackles are expansive. Some years ago you payed about 35,- € for a bronze grade cape, now about 80,- to 90,- €!

That’s the reason I tied the “Poor Mans Pattegrisen”. This pattern is much cheaper, easy to tie and, believe me, it looks really nice in the water! The main ingredient are Whiting HEN Spey Hackles dyed in salmon. They are much cheaper and softer as rooster hackles, but not as long as the original.

Just give the Poor Mans Pattegrisen a try, maybe also in different colours, it’s worth it!

 

Materials:

  • Hook: Partridge CS 54 # 6
  • Weight: Lead Wire
  • Feeler: Whiting Hen Spey Hackles, Fluo Fibre, Krinkle Mirror Flash
  • Ribbing: Mono
  • Eyes: Black Shrimp Eyes
  • Body: Whiting Hen Spey Hackles, Spectra Dubbing
  • Roof: Whiting Hen Spey Hackles
  • Hot Spot: UTC Thread fluo. pink

 

Wind some lead wire around the front part of the hook shank and secure it with super glue.

 

Tie in a spey hackle with the tip first.

 

Wind the hackle towards the hook eye and catch it with your tying thread.

 

Tie some strands of fluo fibre on each side of the feeler.

 

Tie in a strand of krinkle mirror flash on each side and form a little dubbing ball.

 

Tie in the shrimp eyes. The dubbing ball helps to split the eyes nicely.

 

Tie in a piece of mono and a spey hackle.

 

Dub the first part of the body, wind the spey hackle around it and catch it with your thread.

 

Tie in another spey hackle and dub the rest of the body.

 

Wind the hackle around the dubbed body and secure it with your thread, then rib the body with the mono to make it strong and durable.

 

Brush the fly with your velcro brush, so the dubbing fibres are mixed with the hackle fibres.

 

Tie in another spey hackle…

 

… wind it around and secure it with your thread.

 

Take 3-4 spey hackle and equalize the length.

 

Tie in the spey hackles as a roof of the fly.

 

If you want, you can create a little hot spot with fluo tying thread.

 

Varnish the head or put some uv-resin on it. Voilà! The “Poor Mans Pattegrisen”!

tight lines

Holger Lachmann

Tying after walking in the cold

At noon, I decided to do a little walk next to my home river Weser. It was – 7°C and it was snowing. A lot of ice floes were drifting down the river. It looks pretty impressive. I passed a little creek which flow into the Weser and my thoughts were flying into the future summer month, where hungry trout and grayling were rising constantly….

Back home I tied some quick dry flies size 12 with duo colored CDC wings and quill bodies, secured with uv-resin. Looking at these little creatures, I can’t await casting a dry fly to a rising fish again….

Quill CDC Emerger

A simple, but quiet effective mayfly emerger.Tie it in different sizes and colours to match the hatch. The body of the emerger should hang deep in the surface. Never put some floatant on the body, only a bit on the thorax and the wings if necessary. With the amount of uv-resin on the quill, you can control, how deep the fly should hang in the surface.

This pattern often made my day, when other patterns were ignored.

Materials:

  • Hook: TMC 212Y # 13
  • Abdomen: Stripped Peacock Quill and UV-Resin (use tack free resin, if not, you have to coat the resin with nail polish)
  • Thorax: Alpaka Dubbing
  • Wings: CDC and for splitting some Yarn

 

Tie in a stripped peacock quill.

 

Wind the stripped quill around the hook shank and catch it with your thread.

 

Put a layer of uv-resin around the quill body to secure it.

 

Tie in a piece of yarn.

 

Tie in a bunch of CDC fibres.

 

Spin the dubbing around the thread.

 

Dub the thorax.

 

Fold the yarn to the front to split the CDC and catch it with your thread.

 

Whip finish the fly and cut the CDC in shape.

 

View from underneath.

tight lines

Holger Lachmann