Czech Nymphs

To be honest, I’m not a fan of czech nymphing. I just love to cast with a flyrod. Czech nymphing is super effectiv, no doubt about that. It’s just too less casting for my liking… ;-)

The Czech Nymphs on the other hand are pretty cool flies. I didn’t fish them much in the past, but I want to try them in the next season, especially the ones with a little hot spot. This is quite hard for me, because I got a lot more faith in natural colors. Maybe I was wrong all the time, we’ll see….

Czech Nymphs should be weighted AND as slim as possible to sink fast. That’s not the easiest task. You have to find the right amount of dubbing. Less is more!

I look forward testing them in a nice stream for trout and grayling. :-)

 

The last fly of 2013

This Caddis Pupa, tied on a Daiichi Klinkhamer hook # 14 was the last fly I tied in 2013.

Freshwater Shrimp with the new Gammarus Foil by Pro Sportfisher – Step By Step

This is a really natural looking freshwater shrimp. Easy to tie and very durable. It’s tied with the new multi colored Gammarus Shrimp Back from Pro Sportfisher and Bug Bond.

You can get the Gammarus Shrimp Backs in different colors and sizes. Here, I used the brown color in small.

It was never easier to tie a super realistic pattern in such a short time. I believe, that it’ll catch fish from Finnland to Italy!

 

 

Materials:

  • Hook: Tiemco 2487 # 12
  • Weight: Lead Foil
  • Ribbing: Mono 0,14
  • Back: Pro Sportfisher Gammarus brown # small and Bug Bond UV Resin
  • Dubbing: SLF Squirrel Spikey Dubbing mixed with Hends Spectra Dubbing
  • Tail: CDC Feather
  • Thread: Dyneema

 

Take the hook, push down the barb and put it in your vise. Cut a stripe of lead out of the lead foil and create a nice lead body.

 

Take a CDC feather and cut off a “V” from the tip. Tie the feather in as shown.

 

Take a shrimp back from the sheet and tie it in at the end. Tie also in the mono for the ribbing.

 

I used for this Gammarus a mix made out of Squirrel Dubbing and Spectra Dubbing. A natural color with a little bit of flash. Dub a not to slim body.

 

Fold the Gammarus foil to the front and catch it with you tying thread. Then, rib the body with the mono. Catch the mono, cut it off and finish the tying with a whip finish.

 

Now, take your Bug Bond and coat the back of the shrimp and cure it with the Bug Bond torch.

 

Pick out some beards and fibres with your dubbing needle to imitate the legs.

 

The finished shrimp, ready to fish.

 

The shrimp when wet. I don’t think, that a fish can resist.

Tight lines

Holger

Matuka Streamer

Here’s a step by step tutorial for a matuka streamer. This type of streamer is very old and you don’t see it to often in the fly boxes of the fishermen today, but the truth is, that the feathers move nicely, especially when you put some weight in the front of the fly, which causes a jigging effect.

Materials:

  • Hook: Gamakatsu F 314 # 4
  • Feathers: Keough Saltwater Grizzly Hackle, Keough Saltwater Hackle
  • Body: SLF Saltwater Dubbing white and ginger
  • Eyes: Deer Creek Gator Eyes
  • Flash: Krinkle Mirror Flash
  • UV-Resin: Deer Creek Diamond Hard Tack Free Resin
  • Weight: Lead Wire
  • Ribbing: Mono

 

Wind some lead wire around the shank and secure it with super glue.

 

Create a little dubbing ball at the end of the hook shank, tie in a saltwater hackle and wind it around. The dubbing ball pushes the fibres to the sides.

 

Tie in a piece of mono for ribbing. Split the tying thread and put the dubbing mix in the gap. Spin the bobbin to twist the dubbing. Wind the dubbing around the hook shank and brush it with your velcro .

 

Take two feathers and pull some fibres from one side as shown on the photo. Tie in the feather at the front and secure them by ribbing them with the mono. Catch the ribbing with your thread.

 

Tie in some strands of krinkle mirror on each side and do a whip finish with your thread. Take two gator eyes and put them on each side. You should use super glue to secure them. The fly is nearly finished. Just take some Diamond Hard Tack Free resin and let it run between the eyes, then cure it with your uv torch. Repeat this till the gap between the eyes is filled. This makes the fly very strong and durable.

tight lines

Holger Lachmann