Wet Fly “Struppi”

I’m not a wet fly guy. If I remember right, I fished wet flies less than 10 times in more than 20 years of fly fishing. I don’t know why, but it was not “my style”. I prefered more natural looking patterns like CDC dries, nymphs and emerger. I know, that wet flies are catching a lot of fish and some also imitate insects like stillborns or drowning duns, but…. I just don’t like to fish them. That’s also the reason, why I don’t have much experience in tying wet flies. I tied less than 12 classical wet flies in my life.

This year I’ll promised myself to give them more often a chance. That means, that I have also to learn to tie them. Most important, I have to know the materials, especially the feathers for the wings and how they react, when you tie them in.

“Struppi” is one of the first wet flies. It’s kind a freestyle march brown. It’s not a “pretty” fly, but looks very fishy. I mixed a little bit of Ice Dub into the Hare’s Ear Dubbing and so there are some light reflexes in the body. I ribbed it with mono and the tail and the front hackle is made from partridge. For the wing, I’ve used mottled turkey. As hook I choosed a Kamasan B 405 # 12.

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Struppi

 

Orange Struppi

Orange Struppi

Yellow Struppi

 

Biot CDC Parachute

Turkey biots are very good for tying dry fly bodies. They swim really well.

I don’t discribe every tying step here, because they are the same (except the biot abdomen) as you have seen at the quill body CDC parachute tutorial.

Materials:

  • Hook: TMC 100 # 16
  • Tail: Micro Fibetts
  • Abdomen: Turkey Biot
  • Wing: CDC
  • Hackle: Whiting Genetic Dry Fly
  • Thorax: SLF Masterclass

 

tight lines

Holger Lachmann